THE BRITISH LIBRARY

Digital scholarship blog

Enabling innovative research with British Library digital collections

Introduction

Tracking exciting developments at the intersection of libraries, scholarship and technology. Read more

13 July 2018

Get Involved in the Gothic Novel Jam

On the previous Friday the 13th in April, I blogged about the Gaming the Gothic conference, at the University of Sheffield and also shared news that the British Library’s Digital Scholarship team is collaborating on a Gothic Novel Jam with online reading group Read Watch Play during July. Well we are now almost two weeks into the jam and it is great to see people working on their entries by following #GothNovJam and checking the itch.io submission feed.

image from https://s3.amazonaws.com/feather-client-files-aviary-prod-us-east-1/2018-07-13/c3723787-b3d1-4b29-a7f3-2d6a4921def8.png
tweet by @CinereusDarrow

If you would like to make an entry for the jam, you still have 19 days left to create something amazing! As the deadline for uploading submissions to the site is the end of 31st July 2018.

As a reminder, it’s an online creative challenge with a gothic novel theme and it’s open to anyone around the world to participate in. Participants are encouraged to create a whole variety of works on their own or as part of a team. Even though the theme is the gothic novel, you don’t have to limit yourselves to a written submission. Writers, musicians, game makers, artists, crafters, makers of all ages and abilities have signed up from around the world and we are anticipating contributions in all of these areas. Furthermore, submissions don’t have to be limited to these forms. Let your imagination go wild. If you want to bake a cake that looks like a Hound of the Baskerville – go for it! Or you want to make an origami Frankenstein – go for it! Or maybe even a knitted map of Transylvania – go for it! Contribute in whatever way you want to. All we ask is that you have something that you can upload to the official host page at itch.io. Digital works can be uploaded and for physical objects, such as a cake, you could take a photo or video and upload this to the site instead. You’ll retain the copyright of anything you upload. If you haven’t signed up yet, don’t worry you can sign up until the last day.

image from https://s3.amazonaws.com/feather-client-files-aviary-prod-us-east-1/2018-07-13/73f53336-f1db-417d-8e50-f776104cb6ca.png
Tweet by @HazelRaah about an entry made with twine

As we mentioned, the main theme is the gothic novel, but there is also a sub-theme “The monster within”, which was selected from a shortlist of themes suggested and voted on by the jam participants.

We would love participants to use images from the British Library Flickr account as inspiration for submissions. They’re freely available for anyone to use and the following albums may be particularly inspiring:

Ghosts and Ghoulish scenes

Architecture

Castles

Children's Book illustrations

However, don't feel limited to using just those images, the full list of albums can be found here. There are also the Off the Map Gothic Collections of images on Wikimedia Commons and sounds on SoundCloud, which you are free to use. If you want to learn more about the gothic genre and it's authors, check out this hugely informative section of the Discovering Literature website.

If all this talk of jams has whetted your appetite for writing interactive fiction, then you may be interested in attending the Infinite Journeys: Interactive Fiction Summer School booking details are here.  It runs for five days, beginning Monday 23 July and ending on Friday 27 July. 

Also later in the year, on 10-11 November, we are delighted to be hosting the popular Narrative Games Convention AdventureX for International Games Week in Libraries. They currently have a call, which invites people to apply to speak, demo their narrative games, or volunteer. So if you have made an epic #GothNovJam narrative game, then do consider applying to showcase it at AdventureX. Good luck!

This post is by Digital Curator Stella Wisdom (@miss_wisdom) and Gary Green (@ggnewed) from Surrey Libraries.

15 June 2018

Team @BL_DigiSchol join @thecarpentries at #CarpentryCon2018 in Dublin

Conference opening
CarpentryCon 2018
UCD campus
UCD Dublin

Members of the Digital Scholarship team, Alex, Rossitza and Stella, attended The Carpentries community inaugural conference held on the relaxing campus of University College Dublin 29 May-1 June. The atmosphere at the event was energising thanks to the enthusiasm of the community members who volunteer to teach computational, coding and data science skills to researchers worldwide.

The theme of the event “Building Locally, Connecting Globally” permeated the rich programme of talks and interactive sessions that focused on sharing knowledge, networking and developing new content and strategies for strengthening and growing The Carpentries. A report on the conference has been published by Belinda Weaver and this blog post by Raniere Silva summarises well some of the key messages.

Our team exhibited a poster on the Digital Scholarship staff training programme that creates opportunities for staff at The British Library to develop the necessary skills and knowledge to support emerging areas of modern scholarship.

Poster
Digital Scholarship poster
Team poster
Rossitza, Stella and Alex

Thus, particularly relevant for us were the sessions led by Belinda Weaver and Chris Erdmann about growing the software and data skills training provision for library professionals. We engaged in a conversation with members of The Library Carpentry community about how best to review and create new curricula and resources, as well as how the needs of the broader culture heritage professionals may vary. There are opportunities to work with university departments, professional bodies and regional consortia to get library and other GLAM professionals involved with The Library Carpentry. Watch this space for our team's involvement with The Carpentries and for further updates follow The Library Carpentry blog and Twitter feed, and The Carpentry Clippings newsletter.

Below are just few highlights from the sessions we took part in:

@frameshiftlic : Diversity and inclusion go hand in hand. Much more needs to be done to increase diversity and inclusivity in the technology sector.

The Carpentries community uses GitHub to maintain training materials and good guidance was provided on how to clone and fork repositories and submit pull requests.  A great teaching resource Happy Git and GitHub for the useR is being developed for Software Carpentry by Jennifer Bryan

Greg Wilson offered advice on how to keep refreshing teaching methods and content for both the learners’ and instructors’ benefit. His reading list for engaging learners includes The discussion book: 50 great ways to get people talking and Understanding how we learn: A Visual Guide

Tracy Teal talked about the funding model, operations and infrastructure of The Carpentries who have updated their website, logo, handbook and a Code of Conduct. Curriculum development, equality and inclusion, and building local capacity for training remain high priorities for the community.

Most engaging was the interactive breakout session on developing a new software carpentry lesson on High Performance Computing (HPC). The session leader Alan O’Cais used the classroom engagement platform Socrative to gather attendees’ feedback on existing lessons, appropriate content and the learner profile.

Other great sessions covered best approaches to teaching live coding at university, post workshop community development strategies, and how organisations, such as The Software Sustainability Institute and ELIXIR, have been supporting The Carpentries community initiatives.

CarpentryCon group photo Flickr 6000x4000
#CarpentryCon 2018 delegates. Image by Bérénice Batut available at https://flic.kr/p/252fVid under CC-BY-SA 2.0



01 June 2018

Interactive Fiction Summer School and Settle Stories

As a PhD student, I’m privileged to spend three years of my life investigating a subject I find fascinating, but one of the absolute highlights of the first year of my study was the week I spent attending the Interactive Fiction Summer School at the British Library last July. My research explores how mobile phones are changing storytelling, so interactive fiction was a subject I was keen to find out more about – and how better to do so than by learning from the experts how to write my own?

It was an excellent course, as we learned not only about the mechanics of writing stories where the reader plays a part in deciding what happens – how to make your reader’s choices both engaging and manageable, for instance – but also about storytelling more generally: how to generate momentum and make your ending both surprising and inevitable. Over the course of the week, we each wrote our own interactive stories, drawing on what we learned from our tutors and getting to grips with the mechanics of the form: my own story ended up unexpectedly drawing upon my experiences teaching in Japan.

One of the week’s many highpoints was a session on the use of conflict in interactive fiction, run by Rob Sherman, who shared a thought-provoking work he’d created for the housing and homelessness charity Shelter, about a woman struggling to keep her family safe and happy in a world of rising costs, lowering wages, and disappearing support. This year, Rob is leading the British Library's summer school, curating sessions from a range of experts including the poet and interactive writer Abigail Parry (last year’s excellent course leader), Gavin Inglis, and Hannah Powell-Smith.

The summer school had other benefits too: including spending time with fascinating and creative people interested in the storytelling possibilities of interactive fiction, sharing ideas, and collaborating: I remember one particularly memorable session working with two of my fellow students on a story about a performance artist who decides to enact that old myth about frogs in boiling water herself, and ends up in boiled to death in an underground swimming pool as part of an installation about the damage we’re doing to the environment.

The summer school attracted a wide range of people, from young would-be writers, to academics and storytelling professionals. One of my fellow students was Sita Brand, director of Settle Stories, whose annual festival of storytelling takes place in the picturesque Yorkshire market town of Settle. Sita invited me to speak at this year’s Festival, and so I found myself this April talking to an audience about my research into how mobile phones are influencing storytelling and being interviewed by Dave Driver for Dry Stone Radio. (You can hear the interview here – from 1:34 on.)

image from https://s3.amazonaws.com/feather-client-files-aviary-prod-us-east-1/2018-06-01/645a4fba-905f-48c7-8d65-f1513df86a52.png
Telephone box at Settle Stories, where attendees pick up the phone handset and dial for a story

If I've whetted your appetite and you are interested in attending this summer's Interactive Fiction Summer School at the British Library, which is on the theme of Infinite Journeys, booking details are here.  It runs for five days, beginning Monday 23 July and ending on Friday 27 July. Also, if you are interested in my research on fiction being written for smartphones, then I'm giving a Feed the Mind talk on Mobile Stories: New Kinds of Fiction? on Monday 11 June, 12:30-13:30, booking details here.

This a guest post is by Alastair Horne, you can follow him on twitter as @pressfuturist, and also on Instagram.